A Letter from Liz – October 2010

Dear Fritzianca,

As I read your account of your July accident, I caught a feeling of bewilderment followed by wonder. It must be difficult for your organized scheduled self to be involved in momentary chaos.

I love that you see God’s hand in it. I am also relieved that everyone walked away relatively unscathed.

The first time I drove the route home from my new job, I breezed right through a stop sign. Having driven this road several times since, I realize that there are quite a few warnings that a stop is coming.  I spaced out through all of those and am grateful that nothing was coming from the opposite direction. It scared the daylights out of me!
I think that driving a car is too much for our cave-person brain. As Georgene wrote in the recent issue, we Americans have reached an information saturation point. We do too much then wonder why we are brought up short.

Anyway, it is amazing how smoothly things flowed for you after the impact and how you were able to embrace that life is all out of our hands and in God’s plan.
Great September Ninepatch! Thanks for sending it and sharing your story.

Love you!
Liz

Liz/Moascar (Sept. ’10) adds an update, “I have a new teaching job and drive a lot. I leave home before 7:00 am but never seem to get caught up. I’m just trying to stay balanced and hope instruction flows better as we progress.”

Dear Fritzianca,

As I read your account of your July accident, I caught a feeling of bewilderment followed by wonder. It must be difficult for your organized scheduled self to be involved in momentary chaos.

I love that you see God’s hand in it. I am also relieved that everyone walked away relatively unscathed.

The first time I drove the route home from my new job, I breezed right through a stop sign. Having driven this road several times since, I realize that there are quite a few warnings that a stop is coming. I spaced out through all of those and am grateful that nothing was coming from the opposite direction. It scared the daylights out of me!

I think that driving a car is too much for our cave-person brain. As Georgene wrote in the recent issue, we Americans have reached an information saturation point. We do too much then wonder why we are brought up short.

Anyway, it is amazing how smoothly things flowed for you after the impact and how you were able to embrace that life is all out of our hands and in God’s plan.

Great September Ninepatch! Thanks for sending it and sharing your story.

Love you!

Liz

Liz/Moascar (Sept. ’10) adds an update, “I have a new teaching job and drive a lot. I leave home before 7:00 am but never seem to get caught up. I’m just trying to stay balanced and hope instruction flows better as we progress.”

Dear Fritzianca,

As I read your account of your July accident, I caught a feeling of bewilderment followed by wonder. It must be difficult for your organized scheduled self to be involved in momentary chaos.

I love that you see God’s hand in it. I am also relieved that everyone walked away relatively unscathed.

The first time I drove the route home from my new job, I breezed right through a stop sign. Having driven this road several times since, I realize that there are quite a few warnings that a stop is coming. I spaced out through all of those and am grateful that nothing was coming from the opposite direction. It scared the daylights out of me!

I think that driving a car is too much for our cave-person brain. As Georgene wrote in the recent issue, we Americans have reached an information saturation point. We do too much then wonder why we are brought up short.

Anyway, it is amazing how smoothly things flowed for you after the impact and how you were able to embrace that life is all out of our hands and in God’s plan.

Great September Ninepatch! Thanks for sending it and sharing your story.

Love you!

Liz

Liz/Moascar (Sept. ’10) adds an update, “I have a new teaching job and drive a lot. I leave home before 7:00 am but never seem to get caught up. I’m just trying to stay balanced and hope instruction flows better as we progress.”

Dear Fritzianca,

As I read your account of your July accident, I caught a feeling of bewilderment followed by wonder. It must be difficult for your organized scheduled self to be involved in momentary chaos.

I love that you see God’s hand in it. I am also relieved that everyone walked away relatively unscathed.

The first time I drove the route home from my new job, I breezed right through a stop sign. Having driven this road several times since, I realize that there are quite a few warnings that a stop is coming. I spaced out through all of those and am grateful that nothing was coming from the opposite direction. It scared the daylights out of me!

I think that driving a car is too much for our cave-person brain. As Georgene wrote in the recent issue, we Americans have reached an information saturation point. We do too much then wonder why we are brought up short.

Anyway, it is amazing how smoothly things flowed for you after the impact and how you were able to embrace that life is all out of our hands and in God’s plan.

Great September Ninepatch! Thanks for sending it and sharing your story.

Love you!

Liz

Liz/Moascar (Sept. ’10) adds an update, “I have a new teaching job and drive a lot. I leave home before 7:00 am but never seem to get caught up. I’m just trying to stay balanced and hope instruction flows better as we progress.”

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