OWLS AND ECOLOGY


Along with the virus and politics I was dealt a sad blow. When we first moved to our subdivision nineteen years ago, we had many owls.
Over time they were killed off by people using poi-sons to kill the mice the roamed around, mostly drawn by people who did not put all their trash in sealed barrels with tight lids.
After years, and I think because of the quietness of the neighborhood due to COVID-19, we had a new owl move in. He/she loved a huge pine tree outside our bedroom. Each night and many early mornings over the last two months I have enjoyed the melancholy call: hoot-hoot to-hootie.
He/she was found dead this week in the common area behind our home – likely killed by a poisoned rodent he ate.
I have cried so much. Such a beautiful bird.


Georgene (Oct.’20) adds, “It has been a tough week as John and I received news of a friend who has COVID-19. She is sick but not in the hospital. We pray for her recovery. Thank goodness we live in good weather. I think I would be flat thinking about a winter coming and all the bad news we are dealing with.” ** EDITOR’S NOTE: Reader Bookworm (Oct.’20) is a bird-call-identifier. I asked him which owl Georgene might have heard. He replied, “When you hear ‘hoot, hoot to hootie’ the field guides would say that call is, ‘Who cooks for you all.’ Since 2000, barred owls are be-coming common in California.”

A barred owl (Courtesy of Wikipedia) *


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