NINEPATCH FACEBOOK TOPICS for July 2020

Week 1: “The most daring thing I ever did was …”

Week 2: “What the world needs is…”

Week 3: “How long could you give up TV and or social media?”

Week 4: “When did you last cry?”

Week 5: “What’s your favorite dessert or treat?

NINEPATCH FACEBOOK WEEKLY TOPIC COMMENTS

From our Facebook page Week 4, May 2020: “If you saw someone cheating on a test, what would you do?”

DVL (See also “Rooster” in FABRICS) says, “If it were just a test about knowledge and I was taking the test, I would double down and do my very best to try to score higher than the cheater.

On the other hand, if I was giving the test, I would come unhinged, tear up the cheater’s test page and stomp on his/her computer and go into tirade about how cheaters never win! I’d give cheaters the ex-ample of the Aaron Burr/ Alexander Hamilton duel!

Hamilton set his trigger to give himself a cheating edge. His pistol went off prematurely and his bullet struck a tree. Burr cold- heartedly fatally shot Hamilton!

So much for cheaters!”

**

Georgene (See her button this issue.) comments, I would ignore them unless, as in Frances’ example, they were try-ing to copy my paper. The cheat-ing I saw was ink notes in the palm or slips of paper in sleeves. Most were caught by the teacher anyway. I prepared for tests (I was a good crammer but not such a good retainer) so I was usually buried in trying to do my own work.”

**

Fred (Oct. ‘17) adds, “It’s a dilemma. If you don’t report it, you are aiding and abetting. If you do report it you are being a tattletale and may be accused of being sanctimonious. I think you handled it well by taking a smoke break and confronting the cheater directly.”

THE MONTHLY QUESTION

This month our comment – and illustration comes from Georgene (Apr. ‘20). She comments on our MONTHLY QUESTION from April of this year: “If you could wear (design) a button with a maximum of five words describing your outlook on life, what would it say?”

Following is Georgene’s contribution!

She adds, “So much of today’s cultural thinking is different from what I was brought up with. My button reflects my kneejerk reaction to so much of what I hear on TV, in movie dialog and online comments. I then try to understand the new perspective.”

**

June 2020’s question, “What would you like to be doing five years from now?” will continue for July. A new question joins it. “When did you last sing to yourself and what was it?”

THE MONTHLY QUESTION

This month our comment – and illustration comes from Georgene (Apr. ‘20). She comments on our MONTHLY QUESTION from April of this year: “If you could wear (design) a button with a maximum of five words describing your outlook on life, what would it say?”

Following is Georgene’s contribution!

She adds, “So much of today’s cultural thinking is dif-ferent from what I was brought up with. My button reflects my kneejerk reaction to so much of what I hear on TV, in movie dialog and online comments. I then try to understand the new perspective.”

**

June 2020’s question, “What would you like to be doing five years from now?” will continue for July. A new question joins it. “When did you last sing to yourself and what was it?”

IN THE RIGHT HANDS

Perspective in the right hands

Can be a formidable reminder And teaching tool.

Simon Stargazer III

(Apr.’20) adds, “These words were a response to a teacher’s Facebook comment that she used a classroom devoid of desks. She progressed to impressing on her students that much of what we have and enjoy is because of those who went before and fought for our way of life and our freedoms.”

EIGHT MINUTES

Count them!

Long enough to make

Three pieces of toast,

Boil water for eggs,

Vacuum one room,

Give a short speech,

Make words for online

Scrabble—

Think about how long

Eight minutes is—

How painful

How we ask for medication

When pain is excruciating—

When there is no relief

Is why people gather,

Move in large crowds,

Asking for relief,

Protesting when there

Is no drug strong enough

To ease

Toothache left to rot,

Incision left open bleeding—

Eight minutes is a long

Time—

Our lungs do not have room for.

**

A HUG CHANGES THINGS

Between a police chief,

And

A protester:

Real arms surround

The clouded air

In a hug,

Speak without

Words –

A long-lasting photograph

To preserve

Whatever the future.

Exchanges like this

Count more than

Shouting crowds.

Something about a hug

Is

Genuine,

Conveys the kind of love,

Everyone can

Understand.

**

MOVING FORWARD

We are moving forward

Because we have to—

Words from Las Vegas re-opening.

Words for us all, from

Where we stand,

We move on because we have to.

We move on no matter who, what,

Where and what before,

Who are we now?

What now?

Gayle Bluebird (June ‘20) adds, “I think it was ‘eight (plus)’ minutes that affected me the most. How much you can do in eight minutes? Think about it! Then watching how this af-fected all of us, even other countries. Where we go from here, there will be changes. Just watching an officer hugging is where I think it starts. Compassion.”

ANOTHER MYSTERY SERIES

I just finished a mystery! It’s called, Remembering the Dead and is written by Elizabeth J. Duncan. It’s set in Wales and includes some history.

The cover blurb says, “Amateur sleuth Penny Brannigan attends a dinner party at a posh country house–where a historic chair disappears and a waiter is murdered.”

The author has a series of murder mysteries readers may enjoy.

Muffin (June ‘20) adds, “I usually don’t read mysteries but this one was OK for a quick read.”

NEW BOOKS ORDERED

I am still reading! I just ordered three new books through Doubleday Book Club. (I get one free for ordering two!) One is a mystery: John Grishams’s new, Camino Winds.

The other two are historical fiction. The Queen’s Secret is about Queen Elizabeth’s mother. The other is about the Lincoln Conspiracy of 1861. There’s another new book I am waiting to read: Lincoln on the Verge. It’s about his 1860 rail journey to Washington D.C. as a newly elected president.

Once the library is open again, I should get Dead Land by Sara Paretsky. I reserved it before this Covid 19 lockdown. I am eager to read it!

Kay (June ‘20) adds, “When I was in elementary school, I loved filling the library’s Summer Reading Program Card. Guess that’s where I got my love of books in general. I read lots of Nancy Drew mysteries and still love to read them!”

WHILE ISOLATING

I finished reading The Help by Kathryn Stockett. The author grew up in Mississippi and her family had a maid named Demertrie who she dearly loved. She always wished she had asked Demertrie what it felt like to be black in Mississippi, working for her white family. (It never occurred to her to ask.) Demertrie died when Kathryn was only sixteen.

Kathryn spent years imagining what the black woman’s answer would be and that is why she wrote the book.

The book brings up a time when black women were expected to help raise white babies, and yet could not use the same bathroom as their employers.

I loved the book! Not a dull chapter in the lot.

Dottie (May ‘20) adds, “Nice to get in bed, read and move into another world for a while. Trouble is I get sleepy too soon so don’t read that much in a day.”

ROOSTER

One of my most memor-able childhood experiences happened when I was about four years old. I was terrified.

I followed my big brother who was then thirteen, out to gather eggs and feed chickens. A marsh was below the hill where the chicken house stood. While my brother went for eggs, I went down to the marsh to see the ducks.

Our big white Leghorn rooster was down there. He started to chase me! I ran up the hill screaming for help with the rooster in hot pursuit.

My brother stepped out of the chicken house with a hatchet. It was kept by the feed barrel to chop ear corn. He drew back and threw the hatchet! When it hit the rooster, I thought my brother looked like a hero from a movie.

Whatever Mom had planned to cook for supper was changed to fried chicken.

DVL (June ‘20) adds, “Revenge was not only sweet but it tasted good, too!”